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PSF  >  The Lounge  >  Television & Film Discussion  >  Topic: Animated Marvels in Film 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Grapefoot
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« on: 2016-08-17 17:34:03 »

Animated Marvels in Film

Let us see if we can compile a list of animated marvels in film (not television).  This can be any film of all time, whether it was popular or not.  It just had to be at theaters at one point or another.

Once we get a large list, maybe we can narrow it down and try to create a top 50 or top 10 best films. 

Even better yet, if you have clips at the moments in the films you consider marvelous, please share them. 
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Death Blossom
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« Reply #1 on: 2016-08-17 17:41:48 »

Wait so... Just films that we think are awesome? Like, movies we think were marvelous? If I'm interpreting right:

Well, I'd say at the top of my personal list (if claymation counts, which I feel it does) would be ParaNorman. Along with The Secret of NIMH, and The Land Before Time.

I'll get clips of moments I think are animated cinematic marvels. If I can find appropriate clips.
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Grapefoot
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« Reply #2 on: 2016-08-17 18:00:00 »

ParaNorman?  I have never even heard of that.  I would have to go look that one up. 

So completely from an animation standpoint, I think some of the great animation films are... (many more, but here are some I can think of)

Shrek (CGI)
Toy Story (CGI)
Mulan
Cat's Can't Dance
Lion King
Land Before Time
Nightmare Before Christmas (Stop Motion)
Howl's Moving Castle
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
The Iron Giant
The Incredibles (CGI)
Ratatouille (CGI)
101 Dalmations (1961)
« Last Edit: 2016-08-17 18:20:27 by Grapefoot » Logged

Grapefoot
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« Reply #3 on: 2016-08-17 18:30:41 »

Some wonderful animation sequences in here, all specifically chosen to showcase some animation for some of these lesser known films.

Howl's Moving Castle.  A beautiful mix of time periods and cultures in an almost Euro-centric style.  An amazing mix of anime and western styles blend to make this a truly fascinating film in style.

Cat's Don't Dance.  Some might say it is simple, but under appreciated for sure.  It is smooth mimicking cartoon styles from the 40s and 50s, sort of a art deco if you will.  It allows for very smooth transitions and exaggerated proportions at time, but it makes the characters even more alive.  Minimal use of lighting and shading, but it all works with these fun painted backgrounds.

Oliver and Company.  What makes this so unique is that it was one of the first movies to use early forms of CGI, and you will notice it done very smoothly on the cars.  While still hand drawn over the cars, you can tell they used 3D modeling in this 1980s film, and that is impressive.  Painted backgrounds and good smooth movement throughout.
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MasterXtreme
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« Reply #4 on: 2016-08-17 18:34:05 »

What makes hand drawn animation so amazing is that it is the ultimate expression of human emotion.  You see, with hand drawn animation, each movement is drawn by someone, and done for a reason.  Nothing goes unnoticed if split panel by panel.  It was all deliberate and done for a reason.  To evoke emotion in hand drawn cartoons, one has to oversell the expressions, make them exaggerated.  That is something computer generated cartoons do not have, as they are based on a 3D model and rigged to make certain movements and expressions.  In-between work is simply to move from point A to B using a computer, with no emotional thought into it.  Just movement.  Traditional animation, as you all know, is my personal favorite and the ultimate expression of emotion.  I will get some examples up.  Grapefoot, I enjoyed your fairly in-depth reasoning here as well for those three cases. 
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MasterXtreme
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« Reply #5 on: 2016-08-17 18:56:42 »

THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME (SPOILERS)
I don't think I need to explain this too much, it should go without saying how emotional this entire scene is.  Look at the camera angles they choose and the design choices in the color and scenery.  Clearly this is an important climax to the film, a film which has so many animation masterpiece scenes, whether you enjoy the plot or not.  The hard angles, distorted backgrounds, the colors, everything is done with purpose, and it is fascinating.  The villain, Frollo, is a perfect tragic villain, doing what he thinks is right, but falling for the fails of man's sin, that he loses his original intentions and God's Will.  A marvel in animation. 

THE PRINCESS AND THE FROG (SPOILERS)
A more recent film that employs the use of computers helping animators give their hand drawn work the fullest of flash and color.  The desperation in these scene and lunacy.  This is the perfect scene for viewing the collapse of someone's power and how emotion in a characters face has so much power to the viewer.  Something as simple as loose hairs being out of place, extra lines under the eyes, wonderfully captures this character is losing their grasp on control.  Watch his face, watch something as simple as the chain around his neck and how it moves, there is so much to pay attention too, especially for the animators. The colors and again, distorted backgrounds are perfect for this hectic scene, and decline and defeat of a foe with a wonderful character design. 

THE PRINCE OF EGYPT

Before Dreamworks went to Shrek and CGI, they had some absolute gems such as the Prince of Egypt, the telling of Moses from Biblical times in a more Hollywood fashion.  This fascinating scene uses a mix of computer technology and hand drawn prowess to the fullest.  It is the parting of the Red Sea by God.  Look at the sheer amount of people in these scenes, and the clouds swirling above, then the climax of the sea's parting.  The water done to this level could never be done by hand drawn animators, and this is a positive that CGI can do for animators.  Watch part two of this animation marvel to see Pharaoh's army perish as the walls of the sea close upon him.  Some truly wonderful blending of artistry.

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MasterXtreme
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« Reply #6 on: 2016-08-17 19:11:53 »

BALTO

Drawing fur is tough enough, but animating it?  Wow, how about a labor intensive fight scene that spins all body angles in short time frames?  Balto is  an animation marvel, and this scene, as well as so many others, provide ample evidence for it.  What makes it so lovely is you can even partially interpret the line work in the characters faces and body movements.  I love it!  Give this small clip a go.


FOX AND THE HOUND

So many films feel they need to have music in intense scenes as beautifully choreographed as this one... but this film gets it.  It lets nature, the sound of the falls, the fighting, the biting, take center stage in this superbly animated scene.  Whole film is animated great, but check this amazing fight scene out.  The music simply compliments the overly loud falls.  You can feel the mist.  This film was also one of the earliest films I know to use minor use of a shaking camera during a fight scene.  If you find an earlier film, please notify me.


MULAN

The amount of action in these scene is crazy.  You got Hun's attacking in hundreds, look at all those bodies on screen, then you have a wild avalanche.  It is one of the first films to have CGI help with all the Hun's coming over that hill.  All the body styles are smooth and rounded with only subtle use of sharp edges, mainly from armor.  Textures are simple as are colors, but it is smooth and great to watch.  The complexity comes in different ways, by sheer number and action movement. Watch this for an animation trip, and it's done so smoothly in a Western style animation with Eastern flare. 

« Last Edit: 2016-08-17 19:14:28 by MasterXtreme » Logged
Death Blossom
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« Reply #7 on: 2016-08-17 21:21:53 »

Does Anime count?

Oh my god, how could I forget Hunchback of Notre Dame! That's like, my favorite movie!
But yea, Grape, ParaNorman is an amazing movie. By the same people who made Coraline.
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Smiles2us
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« Reply #8 on: 2016-08-17 21:25:37 »

Does Anime count?

Oh my god, how could I forget Hunchback of Notre Dame! That's like, my favorite movie!
But yea, Grape, ParaNorman is an amazing movie. By the same people who made Coraline.

Totally, it's right in the first post and then some anime was already posted.  Anime movies... not tv movies. ;) 
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Grapefoot
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« Reply #9 on: 2016-08-17 21:27:19 »

Does Anime count?
But yea, Grape, ParaNorman is an amazing movie. By the same people who made Coraline.

I haven't seen Coraline either, but I want too.  I love animation. :)

Anime movies count.  Not anime such as tv anime.... that will be in a probably future topic I make about Animation Marvels in television. ;)  That was my original plan if this is popular.  I really want these topics to open up new things some of us may have never seen before. 
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Death Blossom
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« Reply #10 on: 2016-08-17 21:36:38 »

Coraline is also really good, but ParaNorman is an incredibly strong movie. With a good message. And an interesting take on bullying. It's not your typical message for it, but I feel it's pretty realistic. It seems Laika studios has taken a liking to making ugly character designs, as they did that with Box Trolls. But they're going back to prettier designs with Kubo.

And hm okay. Some people separate anime from western animation.

Another good movie, The Brave Little Toaster. I only watched it recently. It's pretty good.
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Smiles2us
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« Reply #11 on: 2016-08-17 21:38:52 »

Coraline is also really good, but ParaNorman is an incredibly strong movie. With a good message. And an interesting take on bullying. It's not your typical message for it, but I feel it's pretty realistic. It seems Laika studios has taken a liking to making ugly character designs, as they did that with Box Trolls. But they're going back to prettier designs with Kubo.

I never knew Laika is making Kubo.  That movie looks cute.  :)  But I am worried the vague trailers and tv ads won't interest enough people.  Box Trolls was a failure for them. 
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Grapefoot
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« Reply #12 on: 2016-08-17 21:40:54 »

No, this is for all animation. :)

Flash back!  The Brave Little Toaster!  Wow!  I remember that movie, but I personally wouldn't call it an animation marvel.  I liked the film, but the animation itself was nothing that special.  This topic is about animation, not the movie plots themselves. 
« Last Edit: 2016-08-17 21:41:13 by Grapefoot » Logged

Death Blossom
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« Reply #13 on: 2016-08-17 21:43:23 »

I thought it was kewl. Especially for their budget.

I wouldn't say Box Trolls was a failure. It was an alright movie. But it wasn't their best. It's easily their worst, but I wouldn't call it a failure. Just ugly. But it was funny at times.
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Grapefoot
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« Reply #14 on: 2016-08-17 21:48:20 »

I haven't seen Box Trolls to know if it was an animation marvel.  A bad movie can still be animated amazingly.  I know it is a ton of work for them to do that.  Ridiculous amounts of hours.
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