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PSF  >  The Lounge  >  Television & Film Discussion  >  Topic: Animated Marvels in Film 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Animated Marvels in Film  (Read 6016 times)
MasterXtreme
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« Reply #30 on: 2016-08-18 11:34:50 »

So are we looking at influential or just... truly awesome animation?  If we do that, that will nix many older films, though certain ones would still be included like Fantasia or Snow White. 

The BFG...

Can't be counted because it was made for television and never in theaters.  I wouldn't call it an animation marvel either.  I remember watching it, weird, weird, weird. 
« Last Edit: 2016-08-18 11:38:15 by MasterXtreme » Logged
MasterXtreme
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« Reply #31 on: 2016-08-18 12:10:29 »

Wall-E (spoilers)

Never has a CGI film evoked as much emotion as Wall-E.  I would even say no film has made a mechanical being have as much emotion as this film, not even the Iron Giant.  Pixar works magic with the limited facial features these robots have and gives them subtle changes to evoke emotion.  I have never felt so much sorrow before for two robots, then have happiness.  You can tell something is different with Wall-E in these scene, his dark eyes.  It is not until the end that his eyes come out of the clouded shadows, and his bright and cherry personality is felt once again.  Eve as well is superb in this entire scene.  It is truly in my top 5 most emotional scenes ever. No kissing, just simple mechanical love. It's a fascinating scene for a fascinating movie that blends absolute beauty in a dystopian future. 


ANASTASIA

Maybe not the greatest plot in films, but that is not what this topic is about, it's about animation, and it is clear that Anastasia has some of the smoothest, most solidly done human animations in a long time.  The movements are so fluid and realistic, yet with a slight cartoon overtone.  But they move as real people would, and to see them drawn frame by frame so perfectly, is astounding.  Even in the several scenes where the camera spins around the characters, it is done so eloquently. This scene showcases the wonderful movement and human expressions with varying character designs. The French look French and the Russian's look Russian.  It makes you want to get up and dance as it evokes fun and welcoming feelings.


SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS

Can you believe this is from 1937?  The amount of detail and quality, fluidity in animation is second to none, and at this point, nothing even came close.  It's high production values, shading, blush in the cheeks, everything, had to be painstakingly painted, drawn and colored, frame by frame.  Yet you never see colors or blush change from frame to frame, they did it perfectly, and that was Disney's high standard they continued with.  Look at the amount of moving bits and characters in this scene.  It is pretty impressive and an animation marvel even today. 

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MasterXtreme
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« Reply #32 on: 2016-08-18 12:28:32 »

THE LION KING

I don't think I need to do this, but this was possibly the greatest hand drawn animation marvel most of you grew up with.  This clip starts out slow, but picks up as armies amass, and lava spews.  The animation is fluid and fun, with heavy tones of darkness and evil.  The Lion King was a masterpiece both in story and animation and really helped continue Disney's animation revival. 


LILO & STITCH

I am not sure if this is a full animation marvel, but that will be left up for discussion by us.  The animation is fluid and really good, with this scene being well choreographed.  What makes it unique is the turn in drawing style compared to most Disney works.  It is round, simple, fluid, and bulbous. Lots of circular shapes and very little pointed or hard shapes.  Clearly more cartoony in nature and fun, with the soft shading and blended textures and colors. 


THE IRON GIANT (spoiler)

Animated vehicles of any type is difficult in animation, but this film uses the help of some CGI with hand drawn covers over the CGI, which is why the Iron Giant blends in with the rest of this film, same with the tanks and military props seen in this clip.  The Iron Giant is a powerful film that didn't get the initial attention it deserved, but has gone down today as a modern classic made by Warner Brothers before their decline in animation.  It goes to show that other studios have amazing talent, but sadly, not the money supporting them.  Fantastic scenes here with great use of camera positioning and once again, giving a mechanical being emotion and feeling.  Be prepared for a lot of action in this scene, which helps further propel this to an animation marvel in film.

« Last Edit: 2016-08-18 12:29:10 by MasterXtreme » Logged
RainyFunshine
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« Reply #33 on: 2016-08-18 12:47:00 »

On our list so far... Based on what everyone has been saying.  Wonderful break downs by the way, MasterX.  Love reading them.

TRADITIONAL

Mulan
Cat's Don't Dance
Lion King
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
The Iron Giant
101 Dalmations
Land Before Time
The Secret of NIMH
Howl's Moving Castle
Oliver and Company
The Hunchback of Notre Dame
The Princess and the Frog
The Prince of Egypt
Balto
Fox and the Hound
The Brave Little Toaster
Beauty and the Beast
The Simpsons Movie
How The Grinch Stole Christmas
Fantasia (original)
Anastasia
Lilo & Stitch

CLAY / STOP MOTION

The Nightmare before Christmas
Coraline
ParaNorman
Wallace and Gromit
Rudolph The Red Nosed Reindeer

CGI

Shrek
Toy Story
the incredibles
Ratatouille
Wall-E
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Wolfwood
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« Reply #34 on: 2016-08-18 13:16:47 »

Based on that list so far, wipe off Rudolph, Wallace and Gromit, The Simpsons Movie, and maybe Lilo and Stitch.

Rudolph was a great classic, but you can't let nostalgia take over.

Wallace Gromit, while great, the claymation just isn't up to par here.

Simpsons Movie had nothing special in terms of animation.  Pretty much a really expensive episode of the show.

Lilo and Stitch, while great... I think the animation is up for debate if it deserves a spot. 
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Death Blossom
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« Reply #35 on: 2016-08-18 16:15:20 »

^
What Wolfwood said. A lot of these are great movies, but nothing in the animation was astounding. It was what you expected of them. For the Simpsons the closest to marvelous was maybe the animation when the family reached the beautiful part of Alaska. But that's it.

Lilo and Stich is an amazing movie with a good story and lots of fun but.... What is there that stands out? It's your standard animation. No really awesome scenes that show how strong and amazing animation can be.

I'd say the same for Bambi, except the scene with April Showers. The animators had to HAND DRAW each freaking drop of rain, how it splatted when it hit the leaf, how it slid down each leaf, the trails it left, how they dropped off the leaf, multiple times with multiple rain drops. Like, holy mother of god, and the scene itself is gorgeous, with amazing music. For me, music is a big part of movies, as a musician you just really tune into that sort of stuff and how it helps evoke such strong emotion.

Let's not forget the fire scenes.
Just look at this animation. Look at how the fire just slowly creeps away from the camp and spreads, and grows, and becomes this huge monstrous thing. The detail put into this, for its time period, it's astounding. Then when the fire reaches the forest how the Sparks and embers fly, the crackling, the way the wood breaks and cinders fall along with it. It's just phenomenal.

A lot of people say the Lion King is Disney's Magnum Opus, but for Disney himself, Bambi was his magnum opus. He loved this movie. It was his best work in his eyes.
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« Reply #36 on: 2016-08-18 17:01:06 »

Useless fact: the sound of the fire is actually  a piece of cellophane being crinkled next to the microphone.

Although Disney has consistently turned out masterpieces for decades and has quite a few film on this list, I think we should give a shout-out to underground pioneers like Ralph Bakshi, who offered us such films as  Fritz the CatCoonskinFire and Ice, and the animated Lord of the Rings film. His work was controversial and groundbreaking for its day, pioneering and refining techniques like rotoscoping and inking actual photograph images onto cels to lend backgrounds a gritty realistic feel.
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« Reply #37 on: 2016-08-18 22:08:04 »

'Who Framed Roger Rabbit'.

Hands down. <3
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MasterXtreme
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« Reply #38 on: 2016-08-18 23:03:50 »

Useless fact: the sound of the fire is actually  a piece of cellophane being crinkled next to the microphone.

Although Disney has consistently turned out masterpieces for decades and has quite a few film on this list, I think we should give a shout-out to underground pioneers like Ralph Bakshi, who offered us such films as  Fritz the CatCoonskinFire and Ice, and the animated Lord of the Rings film. His work was controversial and groundbreaking for its day, pioneering and refining techniques like rotoscoping and inking actual photograph images onto cels to lend backgrounds a gritty realistic feel.

* I was thinking of Bakshi, but at the same time... the animation while inventive and conceptual... I wouldn't call it a marvel.  I know, I know...

Fritz The Cat was a trip of a film though... they all were. 

* I thought of Who Framed Roger Rabbit, and while it may be a fine movie... I don't know if I could consider it an animation marvel.  It is partially live action too, well, a lot of live action.  Like many live action/animation mixed films, the animation did it's job.  It was neat, and so was Space Jam... but were they marvels?  Hmmm.  I guess that is up to the masses.

* Bambi.  It is a stellar film in it's own right, and the animation is amazing for the period, the amount of work put into it... but should it be truly included?
« Last Edit: 2016-08-18 23:05:50 by MasterXtreme » Logged
Ari-Dynamic
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« Reply #39 on: 2016-08-19 04:19:31 »

I'm gonna have to say the Roger Rabbit ought to be considered one for both the technical achievement it brought. Live-action and animation hadn't been done for quite some time since it debuted, and really brought back interest in animation's past while paving the way for modern animation to get the go ahead. Richard Williams really did a fine job keeping it all together - not just him, but you can even thank Spielberg for getting a lot of these characters to meet. While he didn't succeed in getting a few others (there was a storyboard to get Superman and Mighty Mouse and Dick Tracy altogether on the same scene), it was a really ambitious project that paid off.

Plus, it's a really endearing story. The original source material I heard isn't really all that good (nor are some of the attempted sequels Gary K. Wolf tried to attempt getting out to ride the wave of it's success). But I think from 1989 'til now, it really set in motion Disney's finest tales from that point forward.

I wouldn't say it's a marvel in the same vein as say Snow White, which put Disney on the map, but it's certainly something that gave Disney the wake-up call it needed to make the 90's all about itself. Without it-- we wouldn't have had The Disney Afternoon - which is considered by quite a few folks to be on par with Nicktoons and Cartoon Network for it's day. I think with all the talents it had put together, it should be considered a marvel for being a risk - like Snow White - that paid off. A lot of talent combined can do some really fabulous achievements.

Plus it's good quality entertainment. I love a good film noire...





...plus Jessica Rabbit. <3
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« Reply #40 on: 2016-08-19 04:23:01 »

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Death Blossom
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« Reply #41 on: 2016-08-19 07:27:18 »

I think Bambi should, I mean, the fire scenes man. And the rain scenes. And for the time period, this was hand drawn, no computers. Plus, deer walk cycles. The rain scene didn't need to be there, and look at how amazing it is. I mean, if we're questioning of Bambi should be there, shouldn't we question why Balto is there? I mean.... Is just doges in an amazingly well written movie but.... What stood out about it besides it being a good movie? The pieces I've seen, it's just dogs. I do recall a scene with a giant ass bear and a scene with a lakes ice breaking but uh. What exactly is marvelous about the animation?
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AnyPoneDrawn
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« Reply #42 on: 2016-08-19 10:12:04 »

Bambi should be included by the way.  Roger Rabbit probably should be included. 

The Grinch Who Stole Christmas can not be included, as it was never a cartoon in theaters, nor was it a marvel in animation.
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Darrin
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« Reply #43 on: 2016-08-19 11:24:11 »

Updated the list.  We need more entrants.

TRADITIONAL

Mulan
Cat's Don't Dance
Lion King
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
The Iron Giant
101 Dalmations
Land Before Time
The Secret of NIMH
Howl's Moving Castle
Oliver and Company
The Hunchback of Notre Dame
The Princess and the Frog
The Prince of Egypt
Balto
Fox and the Hound
The Brave Little Toaster
Beauty and the Beast
The Simpsons Movie
How The Grinch Stole Christmas
Fantasia (original)

Anastasia
Lilo & Stitch
Bambi
Who Framed Roger Rabbit

CLAY / STOP MOTION

The Nightmare before Christmas
Coraline
ParaNorman
Wallace and Gromit
Rudolph The Red Nosed Reindeer


CGI

Shrek
Toy Story
The Incredibles
Ratatouille
Wall-E
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Death Blossom
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« Reply #44 on: 2016-08-19 12:44:39 »

So my next question is why Shreck? I know it's a meme an all but.... Again. What's amazing about the animation...? I mean, for an old CGI movie, it had some really nice scenes where emotional expressions were really well shown but... Idk. Why do you guys think it's marvelous? I want to be enlightened. As well as those other CGI films, to me they're great movies, but what about the animation itself is awesome?

(Besides Wall-E because their animation was gorgeous. The emotions, the beautiful scenery, Wall-E definitely belongs there).
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